Applications for the 2020 MacRobert Award are now open. 

Applications close 31 January 2020.

Online nomination system

 

About the Award

The MacRobert Award, now celebrating its 50th year, is the UK's longest-running and most prestigious national prize for engineering innovation.

It honours the winning organisation with a gold medal, and the team members a cash prize of £50,000. The presentation of the Award recognises outstanding innovation, tangible societal benefit and proven commercial success.

Past winners have included the engineers behind innovations such as the Pegasus jet engine, catalytic converters, the roof of the Millennium Dome and intelligent prosthetic limbs. In 2017 the Award was won by the team behind the Raspberry Pi microcomputer.

Originally founded by the MacRobert Trust, the Award is now presented and run by the Royal Academy of Engineering, with support from the Worshipful Company of Engineers.


Bombardier announced as 2019 MacRobert Award winner

On 11 July 2019 at Banqueting House in London, Bombardier were announced as winners of the MacRobert Award in the prize's 50th anniversary year.

The Belfast-based company received the UK's premier award for engineering innovation in recognition of their resin-infused advanced composite wing that minimises an aircraft’s environmental impact by reducing both weight and fuel burn in flight, and waste during manufacture.

News: Innovative eco-designed wing secures Bombardier the 2019 MacRobert Award for UK engineering innovation

Academy President Professor Dame Ann Dowling (far left) and HRH The Princess Royal present the MacRobert Award to the Bombardier team: (L-R) Mark Braniff, Trevor Poots, David Patterson, Sam Wilson, David Riordan

Finalists for the 2019 MacRobert Award

The four finalists for the 50th anniversary MacRobert Award, announced in June 2019, were:

  • Bombardier (Belfast) for developing an innovative, resin-infused advanced composite wing that minimises an aircraft’s environmental impact by reducing both weight and fuel burn in flight, and waste during manufacture.
  • Darktrace (Cambridge) for Antigena, an AI-powered ‘self-healing’ cybersecurity system that can both identify and neutralise cyberattacks.
  • M Squared (Glasgow), whose SolsTiS Titanium:Sapphire laser produces the world's purest light and can be tuned across the spectrum - it is enabling new scientific discoveries and bringing about radical transformations in quantum computing, healthcare, navigation and climate change technology.
  • OrganOx (Oxford) for creating the metra, a world-first device that can keep a human donor liver functioning outside the body for up to 24 hours prior to transplant.

Press release: MacRobert Award announces 2019 finalists