The Africa Prize encourages ambitious and talented sub-Saharan African engineers from all disciplines to apply their skills to develop scalable solutions to local challenges.
Video © Sarah Fretwell.

The 2019/2020 Africa Prize is now OPEN for applications.


The Africa Prize encourages ambitious and talented sub-Saharan African engineers from all disciplines to apply their skills to develop scalable solutions to local challenges, highlighting the importance of engineering as an enabler of improved quality of life and economic development. Crucial commercialisation support is awarded to a shortlist of innovative applicants through an eight-month period of training and mentoring.

Following this period of mentorship, finalists are invited to present at an event held in Africa and a winner is selected to receive £25,000 along with three runners-up, who are each awarded £10,000.

Interactive tool - explore the shortlists and winners of the Africa Prize from 2015-2019


Meet the 2019 winner

Africa Prize judges Dr John Lazar CBE FREng and Mariéme Jamme present South African Neo Hutiri of Pelebox with the Africa Prize winner's medal
A 31-year-old South African electrical engineer has won the Royal Academy of Engineering’s 2019 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation. Neo Hutiri is the first South African to win the prestigious Africa Prize.

Hutiri and his team developed Pelebox, a smart locker system designed to dispense medicine to patients with chronic conditions. Pelebox is used at public healthcare facilities in South Africa, cutting down on long queues and easing pressure on the healthcare system.

The team win the first prize of £25,000. At an awards ceremony in Kampala, Uganda on 4 June 2019, four finalists from across sub-Saharan Africa delivered presentations, before Africa Prize judges and a live audience voted for the most promising engineering innovation.

Press release: Smart medicine dispenser that could improve access to treatments for millions wins the Africa Prize


The Africa Prize is generously supported by The Shell Centenary Scholarship Fund and the UK Government's Global Challenges Research Fund.

Historical sponsors have included Consolidated Contractors Company, The Foreign and Commonwealth Office's Africa Prosperity Fund, ConocoPhillips and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation.

If you would like to know more or are interested in being involved please contact the Africa Prize team at the Royal Academy of Engineering.