Some of the UK’s youngest and most successful engineers will be in Sheffield this weekend for the Women’s Engineering Society annual conference at Kenwood Hall.

Among them will be some of the UKRC’s Ingenious Women, who will describe their enthusiasm for engineering and their inspiring jobs during a panel session on Saturday afternoon chaired by former Tomorrow’s World presenter Kate Bellingham.

The Ingenious Women range from building services engineer Chloe Richards, who designs piping systems for pharmaceutical and food plants, to environmental services engineer Yewande Akinola, who develops rainwater harvesting systems and starred in Channel 4’s Titanic series.

Energy engineer Katy Deacon develops renewable energy systems for public buildings in Huddersfield and invented a renewable energy toolkit to help others in her industry, while structural engineering Leonie Baker of Ramboll helped to design a new theatre in Aylesbury.

Only eight per cent of engineers are women and more good role models are badly needed. The Ingenious Women project, supported by the Royal Academy of Engineering, aims to help the engineers raise their profile in order to inform and inspire the media, employers, learning providers, the wider public and the next generation.

Notes for editors

  1. Ingenious Women: Communicating a Passion For Engineering is an exciting opportunity for 20 early to mid career women engineers to get free training and support to enable them to raise their profile and share their passion for engineering. Ingenious Women started in September 2010 and ends March 2011. The project is funded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, as part of its  Ingenious grants progamme It is run by the UK Resource Centre for women in science, engineering and technology and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. For more details see  www.theukrc.org/about-us/our-projects/ingenious-women/the-20-engineers
  2. WES, the Women’s Engineering Society, holds its 2010 annual conference Making Digital Britain: inspiring future changes on 19-22 November at Kenward Hall in Sheffield.
  3. Founded in 1976, The Royal Academy of Engineering promotes the engineering and technological welfare of the country. Our fellowship – comprising the UK’s most eminent engineers – provides the leadership and expertise for our activities, which focus on the relationships between engineering, technology, and the quality of life. As a national academy, we provide independent and impartial advice to Government; work to secure the next generation of engineers; and provide a voice for Britain’s engineering community.

For more information please contact

Dr Daniela Romano at the University of Sheffield
Tel. 0114 222 1900, email:  Dr Daniela Romano

or

Jane Sutton at The Royal Academy of Engineering
Tel. 020 7766 0636; email:  Jane Sutton