The Royal Academy of Engineering has announced the winners of the Engineering Teaching Prizes that look to reward the most able lecturers who have chosen to remain in the higher education sector during the early years of their career. Prizes are awarded on a competitive basis to lecturers at UK universities working in the field of electrotechnology. Six prizes are awarded annually each with a value of £10,000 to lecturers who have been seen to promote engineering as a rewarding and creative career and in establishing industrial-academic links which ensure the output of top quality graduate engineers.

Chris Elliot, FREng Chair of the Selection Committee comments, “The Academy was overwhelmed with the quality and diversity of this year’s entries and the eventual winners can regard themselves as the true elite amongst their peers.”

Prizes were awarded to Dr Kerstein Eder, University of Bristol; Mrs Elena Rodriguez-Falcon, University of Sheffield; Dr William Knottenbelt, Imperial College London, Dr Andy Hunt; University of York; Dr Andrea Cavallaro, Queen Mary University and Dr Sherri Johnstone of Durham University.

The prizes for Northern based lecturers Mrs Elena Rodriguez-Falcon, Dr Andy Hunt and Dr Sherri Johnstone were presented at one of The Academy’s regional events held this year at Manchester University.

One of this year’s winners Dr William Knottenbelt commented “I feel very honoured to receive this award. It is gratifying to see that The Royal Academy recognises the vital role that teaching plays in producing high quality graduate engineers for the UK.”

Notes for editors

  1. Founded in 1976, The Royal Academy of Engineering promotes the engineering and technological welfare of the country. Our fellowship – comprising the UK’s most eminent engineers – provides the leadership and expertise for our activities, which focus on the relationships between engineering, technology, and the quality of life. As a national academy, we provide independent and impartial advice to Government; work to secure the next generation of engineers; and provide a voice for Britain’s engineering community.
  2. The Engineering Teaching Prizes have been established to reward the most able lecturers who have chosen to remain in the higher education sector during the early years of their career. Prizes are awarded on a competitive basis to lecturers in electronics or electrical engineering at higher education institutions in the UK. Ideal candidates should have distinguished themselves from their peer group by showing a strong and continuing commitment to teaching, professional activities, promoting engineering as a rewarding and creative career, establishing industrial-academic links and other activities which ultimately ensure the output of top quality graduate engineers.
  3. Up to six prizes are to be awarded annually, each having a value of £10,000 and the programme has been made possible through the generosity of the ERA Foundation.

For more information please contact

Tonia Page at The Royal Academy of Engineering Tel. +44 07770 845984