Resources to enrich the STEM curriculum are great for using in the classroom to add context to the curriculum, or as a STEM challenge day.

Mission to mars

Existence at the extreme

Controlling Motion - A Cornerstone Maths investigation of linear functions

Drones: friend or foe?

Deployable structures

Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster?

Winning medals: does engineering design make a difference?

Athlete or machine? Which is more important in the bob skeleton event?

 

Mission to mars

This KS3 resource explores the science, technology, engineering and maths involved in the space exploration. Students investigate the STEM behind launching a rocket, landing a spacecraft on another planet and how science and engineering can make it possible to live on another world.

Mission to mars : Student's guide (15.26 MB)

Mission to mars : Teacher's guide (17.63 MB)

 

Existence at the extreme

These KS3 resources explore how different indigenous populations have used engineering to allow them to live in extreme environments and what we can learn from these solutions. They also explore some modern engineering solutions to living in extreme environments.

Existence at the extreme: Teacher's guide (5.40 MB)

Existence at the extreme: Desert (5.79 MB)

Existence at the extreme: Monsoon (5.63 MB)

Existence at the extreme: Subzero (3.52 MB)

Existence at the extreme: Case study Engineers Without Borders UK (853.02 KB)

Existence at the extreme: Case study (508.50 KB)

 

Controlling motion - A Cornerstone Maths investigation of linear functions

Controlling Motion uses Cornerstone Maths' dynamic interactive web-based environment to give Key Stage 3 students an introduction to the 'hard to teach' concept of linear functions.

Controlling motion: Poster (4.62 MB)

Controlling motion: Sticker (834.09 KB)

Controlling motion: Intro task A (688.62 KB)

Controlling motion: Task B (675.07 KB)

Controlling motion: Task C (761.66 KB)

Controlling motion: Task D (728.94 KB)

Controlling motion: Task E (695.76 KB)

Controlling motion: Task F (679.79 KB)

Controlling motion: Task G (686.70 KB)

Controlling motion: Task H (679.03 KB)

Controlling motion: Task I (804.32 KB)

Controlling motion: Task J (671.80 KB)

Controlling motion: Teacher's notes (2.42 MB)

 

Drones: friend or foe? 

These KS3 and KS4 resources give students the opportunity to explore how different systems within drones work and how they can be used for civilian, humanitarian and commercial purposes.

Drones: friend or foe? Teachers' guide (6.35 MB)

What is a drone activity (8.91 MB)

Missing drone activity (22.17 MB)

Optimal propeller activity (6.17 MB)

Remote data activity (6.44 MB)

Remote data activity bitmap grid (648.04 KB)

Safe delivery activity (5.81 MB)

Thinking like a drone activity (5.54 MB)

Thinking like a drone activity tracks (637.93 KB)

Case study: Sabine Hauert (4.47 MB)

Case study: ASV (4.78 MB)

 

Deployable structures

These resources allow the learning of maths within the engineering context of deployable structures. There are a range of KS3 maths topics covered including density, nets, transformations, scale, conversions, circles, area, compound shapes and problem solving.

Deployable structures: teachers' guide (1.35 MB)

Flowers - natural deployable structures (5.08 MB)

Group umbrella (1.96 MB)

Maths beneath my feet (1.58 MB)

Mosquito nets (1.84 MB)

Rolling bridges (2.09 MB)

Solar panels (1.63 MB)

Company case study: Concrete Canvas Ltd (1.07 MB)

Case study: Veronika Kapsali (758.28 KB)

 

Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster? 

This resource presents a set of STEM challenges in the context of a natural disaster. Students undertake challenges related to the need for shelter and clean water in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster. It also presents some of the answers to the ‘big question’ in the title.

Disaster response: Student support sheets (2.36 MB)

Disaster response: Student version (946.25 KB)

Disaster response: Teacher's guide (1.27 MB)

 

Winning medals: does engineering design make a difference? 

The success of any athlete is the result of many hours of training, dedication and sacrifice. However, in the case of wheelchair athletes there is an added dimension – the work of the engineer who designed the wheelchair. When a wheelchair athlete wins a medal, to what extent has engineering design made a difference to the wheelchair athlete’s performance?

Winning medals: Teacher's version (525.53 KB)

Winning medals: Student's version (425.01 KB)

 

Athlete or machine? Which is more important in the bob skeleton event? 

In order to answer this question, students must identify factors that influence the performance of the bob skeleton. They must also investigate each one through practical, mathematical and scientific activities.

Athlete or machine? Which is more important in the bob skeleton event? (5.12 MB)