The Academy’s curriculum resources provide longer learning activities for use in a STEM club, for a STEM challenge day or to enhance and add context to the curriculum. Developed primarily to engage Key Stage 3 students with STEM  subjects, such as D&T, ICT, science and mathematics, the resources give students the opportunity to learn by investigating big questions and working in an engineering context.

The following themed resources are all free to download.

Drones: friend or foe? 

Deployable structures

Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster?

Winning medals: does engineering design make a difference? 

Athlete or machine? Which is more important in the bob skeleton event?

Drones: friend or foe? 

This resource gives students the opportunity to explore how drones work and how they can be used for civilian, humanitarian and commercial purposes.

In each activity, students undertake challenges relating to a different system within the drone as well as thinking about the impact the technology might have. There are a range of KS3 and KS4 D&T, computing, science and mathematics topics covered including binary numbers, energy, forces and motion, geometry and measure, interpreting graphs, ratios, solving problems, waves and many more.

The resources consist of a teacher’s guide to explain how the activities could be used which includes curriculum links, six activities and two case studies about engineers involved in autonomous vehicles.

Drones: friend or foe? Teachers' guide (6.35 MB)

What is a drone activity (8.91 MB)

Missing drone activity (22.17 MB)

Optimal propeller activity (6.17 MB)

Remote data activity (6.44 MB)

Remote data activity bitmap grid (648.04 KB)

Safe delivery activity (5.81 MB)

Thinking like a drone activity (5.54 MB)

Thinking like a drone activity tracks (637.93 KB)

Case study: Sabine Hauert (4.47 MB)

Case study: ASV (4.78 MB)

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Deployable structures

These resources allow the learning of maths within the engineering context of deployable structures.

There are a range of KS3 maths topics covered including density, nets, transformations, scale, conversions, circles, area, compound shapes and problem solving.

The resources consist of a teacher’s guide to explain how the activities could be used, six activities and two case studies about engineers involved in deployable structures. Please read the safety advice in each activity.

Deployable structures: teachers' guide (1.35 MB)

Flowers - natural deployable structures (5.08 MB)

Group umbrella (1.96 MB)

Maths beneath my feet (1.58 MB)

Mosquito nets (1.84 MB)

Rolling bridges (2.09 MB)

Solar panels (1.63 MB)

Company case study: Concrete Canvas Ltd (1.07 MB)

Case study: Veronika Kapsali (758.28 KB)

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Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster? 

This resource presents a set of STEM challenges in the context of  a natural disaster.

Students undertake challenges related to the need for shelter and clean water in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster. It also presents some of the answers to the ‘big question’ in the title.

The resource consists of a student booklet of activities and a teacher booklet containing all the student activities plus additional information and guidance for teachers. There is also a separate booklet of activity support sheets, so that teachers can decide the amount of support to provide for individual students.

Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster? - student support sheets (2.36 MB)

Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster? - student version (946.47 KB)

Disaster response: how do engineers save lives in the aftermath of a natural disaster? - teacher guide (4.19 MB)

A spreadsheet to support student activity 2C, as referred to on page 20 of the teacher’s version of the Disaster Response publication:
Site capacity estimation worksheet - Disaster response resource (320.19 KB)

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Winning medals: does engineering design make a difference? 

The aim of this resource is to give students the chance to investigate the impact of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) on wheelchair sport.

The success of any athlete is the result of many hours of training, dedication and sacrifice. However, in the case of wheelchair athletes there is an added dimension – the work of the engineer who designed the wheelchair. When a wheelchair athlete wins a medal, to what extent has engineering design made a difference to the wheelchair athlete’s performance?

Winning medals: does engineering design make a difference? - teacher version (525.71 KB)

Winning medals: does engineering design make a difference? - student version (425.23 KB)

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Athlete or machine?  Which is more important in the bob skeleton event? 

In order to answer this question students must identify factors that influence the performance of the bob skeleton. They must also investigate each one through practical, mathematical and scientific activities.

By encouraging STEM learning based on student-led investigation, problem-solving and higher order thinking, students will be able to provide their own enquiry-led, sophisticated and justified answer to a difficult real world question.

Athlete or machine? Which is more important in the bob skeleton event? (4.70 MB)

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